Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads: New Techniques, Extraordinary Flavor

Peter Reinhart s Whole Grain Breads New Techniques Extraordinary Flavor We know whole grain breads are better for us but will we actually eat them much less take time to bake them Yes says beloved baking instructor Peter Reinhart but only if they are very very good S

  • Title: Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads: New Techniques, Extraordinary Flavor
  • Author: Peter Reinhart Ron Manville
  • ISBN: 9781580087599
  • Page: 372
  • Format: Hardcover
  • We know whole grain breads are better for us, but will we actually eat them, much less take time to bake them Yes, says beloved baking instructor Peter Reinhart, but only if they are very, very good So Reinhart, with his decades of experience crafting amazing artisanal breads, has made it his mission to create whole grain breads that are nothing short of incredible In thWe know whole grain breads are better for us, but will we actually eat them, much less take time to bake them Yes, says beloved baking instructor Peter Reinhart, but only if they are very, very good So Reinhart, with his decades of experience crafting amazing artisanal breads, has made it his mission to create whole grain breads that are nothing short of incredible In this follow up to his award winning book The Bread Baker s Apprentice, Reinhart offers groundbreaking methods for making whole grain breads that taste better than any you ve ever had And because his approach is also simpler and less labor intensive than conventional techniques, you ll choose to make and eat these breads His fifty five recipes for whole grain sandwich, hearth, and specialty breads, plus bagels, crackers, and , incorporate widely available whole wheat flour as well as other flours and grains such as rye, barley, steel cut oats, cornmeal, and quinoa Each is so rich with flavor and satisfying texture that white flour counterparts pale in comparison.Written in Reinhart s famously clear style and accompanied by inspiring photographs, these recipes were perfected with the help of nearly 350 testers Introductory chapters provide a tutorial, with step by step photographs, of the delayed fermentation method that is at the heart of these recipes, as well as a crash course in baking science, discussions of grains other than wheat, and Advanced bakers will relish Reinhart s innovative techniques and exacting scientific explanations, and beginning bakers will rejoice in the ease of baking wholesome breads with such extraordinary flavor.Peter Reinhart is a baking instructor and faculty member at Johnson and Wales University in Charlotte, North Carolina He was the cofounder of Brother Juniper s Bakery in Santa Rosa, California, and is the author of six books on bread baking, including Brother Juniper s Bread Book, Crust and Crumb, and the 2002 James Beard Cookbook of the Year and IACP Cookbook of the Year, The Bread Baker s Apprentice.

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      Published :2018-08-18T20:34:27+00:00

    1 thought on “Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads: New Techniques, Extraordinary Flavor”

    1. My favorite breads are all in there! The recipes are detailed and often takes several days to complete - which is all right. This will be a book that will change the way I make bread - for the better.

    2. This is the best book on whole grain bread baking that I have read. Ever. For more than one reason. He explains his method of delayed fermentation as a way to the best taste and texture for whole grain loaves. But from my studies, it is also the best for nutritional reasons as well. Whole grains should always be soaked for 7 hours or more to activate enzymes and deactivate enzyme inhibitors and phytates present in all seeds - these enzyme inhibitors and phytates, if not deactivated, cause proble [...]

    3. If I was to choose a book that taught me more about bread-making than any other, it would have to be this one. It insisted, it seemed to me, to begin with a wild yeast starter which I did, and kept going for over a year. The starter forced me to prepare bread at least once a week over that period and as a result, I became knowledgeable about textures and stages of readiness that over the many previous years of preparing breads I had never really understood, nor mastered.But I grew fat over that [...]

    4. I have a sneaking suspicion that Peter Reinhart's method is too complex, at least for lazy old me, and I'm sure if I do incorporate his techniques into my baking in the long term that I'll be simplifying and paring them down. But still: some of the best whole-wheat bread I've ever baked has come from the recipes in this book. I recommend it to anyone who really wants to learn more about the potential of whole grains to make a rich, complex artisan loaf.

    5. The beginning is a very good and readable introductions to wheat, enzymes, and how bread ferments, develops taste, and rises. I've made the master recipe with a biga twice to good results. It's definitely whole wheat bread that tastes like whole wheat, but my 18 month old scarfs it down happily.

    6. An interesting book, but ultimately Reinhart's approach to baking is so different from mine that I don't know how much I'll use from it. He honestly seems to be overthinking it by half when it comes to a standard hearth loaf. I am curious to try some of the other recipes, though, especially for European traditional breads. I do appreciate his scientific approach, if only for the fact that I always learn a lot from reading his books, just more factual knowledge than practical. His attachment to e [...]

    7. Lots of reading before getting to the recipes but it helps one understand better the 'personality' of bread. My go to recipes for bread at home.

    8. Author's tips & tricks are more interesting to me than his full recipes, as with previous volumes of his I've read. Wanna try the thing with rosemary/potato water soaker.

    9. When I came across Peter Reinharts's Whole Grain Breads: New Techniques, Extraordinary Flavor, I just had to try it out. I had already read his Bread Baker's Apprentice book and really enjoyed it. Wow! Does he ever deliver. I love the science of bread that he puts into his books. Not being a chemist, I think the actual chemistry behind all the reactions in the dough is a little beyond me, bit the deconstruction of the bread, the nitty-gritty how it works is what really intrigues me. I am an engi [...]

    10. Of course, "finished" is a silly term to apply to a cookbook that you liked and intend to continue using. But I have flipped through it all and baked one recipe.The recipe was not a total success, but it's what I'm eating (with pleasure) for breakfast. It's the all sprouted grain recipe. I'm going to try it again and wait longer for the sprouts to do their thing, and maybe add less water to the dough. It didn't rise as high as I hoped. But for how little sprouts put through a meat grinder look l [...]

    11. I've had a lot of success with Reinhart's earlier bread baking book, The Bread Baker's Apprentice. This book is similar, but with an emphasis (as the title suggests) on whole grain breads. It begins with a lengthly explanation of the baking process, including background on Reinhart's innovative techniques for working with whole grain doughs. The recipes seem well organized and easy to follow. I've only baked one recipe from this book, so far---a "Transitional" Country Hearth Bread. "Transitional [...]

    12. This is an incredibly thorough, scientifically researched book with a wealth of valuable information. I do not, however, recommend it as a guide for a first, or even second, attempt at making bread with starter. This man has decades of experience baking bread, and this is his method for making perfect whole-grain breads. I have baked bread with yeast and with starter before, and I was not employed so had lots of time and energy to devote to this--yet I was still overwhelmed by the number of comp [...]

    13. I picked this up in my quest for a loaf of true whole wheat bread (no white flour at all) that actually rises and tastes like something other than a slightly edible brick of bread. My first experience with the "Beginner's loaf" was a little tentative. It was very tasty, but the second rise did not go well. Never say die, I am soldiering on and have produced a wonderful loaf of crusty outside, soft inside. I want to cheer.Take the time to read the book before you dash into the baking. This is a v [...]

    14. I loved this cookbook so much that I bought it. I checked it out from the library to see if I would like a few of the recipes out of it. There are many recipes that I have used and continue to use. I love the theory that he presents at the beginning of the book. There is a lot of information there that I found to be useful in my career and here at home. I make a lot of bread and most of it is wheat bread. His ideas of making a soaker and a biga then putting them together to get the best flavor i [...]

    15. Wow - this man is a true bread master, a finding corroborated by quite a bit of web research (bread aficionados not yet familiar with thefreshloaf should check it out). I appreciated the in-depth description of bread chemistry, which while not essential to my own bread-making experience was interesting though not likely something I'll remember. I don't know how many years it would take me to make all the breads I want to try in this book, but I did find one that has become a staple at our house [...]

    16. This is a cookbook - or rather, a bread baking book - and thus it was rather hard to rate. The first hundred pages are about the theory of bread baking, and while much was a bit beyond my highly limited knowledge of organic chemistry, I did read it and found much of it both surprising and interesting. I then tried to bake some whole wheat bread, according to his methodology and following his recipe. The first - I guess I lost patience, and did not follow the steps exactly. The second - closer b [...]

    17. What I'm most interested in is parlaying the techniques I've picked up from Reinhart into grain - whole, partial, mixed, - breads. I didn't find many of interest in the two books that I own but I'm hoping to find something in this one. Along with a lot of repetition. I am making better and more consistent bread than ever. My sponge [which was fascinating to make:] has been going strong since April and produces tasty, light [not reliably crisp tho' - after the first few hours:] and quite presenta [...]

    18. I am attempting to make whole wheat sourdough and this book was suggested on one of the bread forums I visited. Reinhart's book is geared towards those who have more advanced baking skills but he does a good job of including thorough explanations that a novice can understand. Many of the artisan breads featured in the book are not ones I would attempt, but they do sound wonderful and would be of great interest to those who know how to get around the kitchen or bakery. Although the book covers th [...]

    19. I have not read a lot of books on whole-grain baking, but in my opinion this is probably one of the best. It is certainly the best one that I've read. Reinhart not only provides a number of recipes for the cook to try, but he also explains his technique in detail. I am particularly fond of the recipe for Struan. I would also say that the pizza dough recipe in this book made the finest pizza I have ever eaten. Surprisingly, it contained all whole-grain flour. If you are interested in adding more [...]

    20. Another textbook/reference for the dedicated baker, this is a studied exploration on how to develope the rustic style of whole grain bread into something with great flavour. Often delving into the science of baking, Reinhart guides the reader through his evolving process of creating a better way to integrate whole grains into our diet. This book is NOT for the novice baker, but for the passionate & creative seeker.

    21. Learn how to make bread good. With a focus on whole grains and Reinhart's 'double fermentation' method (two-day refrigerated fermentation of a wild yeast starter or commercial yeast biga and a soaker). Lots of 'transitional' recipes as well (i.e. ways to incorporate white flour and serve as a gateway to pure wheat or whole grain breads). I've been making bread and other baked goods from this book for a year or so and it tastes good when you eat it.

    22. It's a good book but I wish I'd chosen one with a simpler approach. I found a video on youtube from delectable planet for making whole wheat bread that taught me to make an equally tasty loaf without all of the starters, biga, or soakers. For me, a lazy (but crunchy) home cook, this book is overkill. I think the video, combined with something more like the classic "Wings of Life", would have been a better choice.

    23. A great book from one of my favorite authors on the subject of bread. The author went from hippie to award-winning professional baker, to author, then wrote a whole collection of books on traditional breads. In this book, he returns to his hippie roots to discuss modern techniques for achieving whole grain nirvana.

    24. I am intrigued. I haven't tried any of the recipes yet, but I think they sound fantastic and the author is very knowledgeable in the "grains" department. Don't know that I will ever give up my Gram's white bread recipe though (its just too good), but I'd love to incorporate Reinhart's whole grain techniques into my bread-making.

    25. So, I found this book at the library while I was looking for a recipe for honey whole wheat hearth bread, and I am in love! As a food scientist, I like the way he details what is happening in the bread making process and what he did to discover his method of baking. I'll have add to this review when I get a chance to try a recipe!

    26. This is the best bread baking book for whole grains I have ever come across. I have tried probably 10 different recipes from this book with great success. I bake bread every week now and love how it turns out. His method of bread baking also maximizes the nutrition in each loaf by allowing the enzymes in wheat to do their work before baking. I own this book and use it several times a week.

    27. I really liked reading about the science and "whys" behind the techniques. I've made the master recipe once, and I thought the flavor was quite good (which is nice because I have to cook dairy-free, and most dairy-free recipes I've tried seem bland). It was a little too crumbly to make a good sandwich, though, but I'll keep trying.

    28. Wow you have to really, really be into bread to take on this book. Reinhart outlines his multi-decade effort to create flavourful whole grain breads in great detail. I almost found this book creating a barrier to my own inept stumblings, because his techniques are time-consuming and intense. I think I'm too much of a beginner for this one.

    29. This is hands-down the most difficult cookbook I've ever read. Just making the preparations to create my first loaf of bread took 200 pages of reading and a week of work. So far, I haven't had any success, so I'm retiring Reinhart to the kitchen bookshelf for now. If I ever do succeed at making a loaf, this had better be the best bread I've ever eaten.

    30. Borrowed Whole Grain Bread from the library quite a while ago, found it fascinating and informative. Maybe a little too informative, kept wondering if it's really all simpler than it sounds. May purchase this later, if I ever start making homemade bread on a regular basis (and that's something I would like to do).

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