Hank Greenberg: The Hero Who Didn't Want to Be One

Hank Greenberg The Hero Who Didn t Want to Be One One of the reasons baseball fans so love the sport is that it involves certain physical acts of beauty And one of the most beautiful sights in the history of baseball was Hank Greenberg s swing His ca

  • Title: Hank Greenberg: The Hero Who Didn't Want to Be One
  • Author: Mark Kurlansky
  • ISBN: 9780300136609
  • Page: 303
  • Format: Hardcover
  • One of the reasons baseball fans so love the sport is that it involves certain physical acts of beauty And one of the most beautiful sights in the history of baseball was Hank Greenberg s swing His calmly poised body seemed to have some special set of springs with a trigger release that snapped his arms and swept the bat through the air with the clean speed and strengthOne of the reasons baseball fans so love the sport is that it involves certain physical acts of beauty And one of the most beautiful sights in the history of baseball was Hank Greenberg s swing His calmly poised body seemed to have some special set of springs with a trigger release that snapped his arms and swept the bat through the air with the clean speed and strength of a propeller But what is even extraordinary than his grace and his power is that in Detroit of 1934, his swing or its absence became entwined with American Jewish history Though Hank Greenberg was one of the first players to challenge Babe Ruth s single season record of sixty home runs, it was the game Greenberg did not play for which he is best remembered With his decision to sit out a 1934 game between his Tigers and the New York Yankees because it fell on Yom Kippur, Hank Greenberg became a hero to Jews throughout America Yet, as Kurlansky writes, he was the quintessential secular Jew, and to celebrate him for his loyalty to religious observance is to ignore who this man was.In Hank Greenberg Mark Kurlansky explores the truth behind the slugger s legend his Bronx boyhood, his spectacular discipline as an aspiring ballplayer, the complexity of his decision not to play on Yom Kippur, and the cultural context of virulent anti Semitism in which his career played out.What Kurlansky discovers is a man of immense dignity and restraint with a passion for sport who became a great reader a man, too, who was an inspiration to the young Jackie Robinson, who said, Class tells It sticks out all over Mr Greenberg.

    • Unlimited [Psychology Book] ☆ Hank Greenberg: The Hero Who Didn't Want to Be One - by Mark Kurlansky ✓
      303 Mark Kurlansky
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Psychology Book] ☆ Hank Greenberg: The Hero Who Didn't Want to Be One - by Mark Kurlansky ✓
      Posted by:Mark Kurlansky
      Published :2018-08-22T00:01:45+00:00

    1 thought on “Hank Greenberg: The Hero Who Didn't Want to Be One”

    1. A quick, but interesting biography of Hank Greenberg--the first major Jewish baseball star. The book focuses quite a bit on the contrast of Greenberg’s own secularism with his fame as Jewish athlete. Greenberg was a hero to Jews in America in the 30s and 40s (and beyond), not just for being a great baseball player but for sitting out a regular season game against the Yankees because it fell on Yom Kippur. This was not from a need for religious observance, but from a connection to his family an [...]

    2. As with any good biography, the charachter is interesting and gives the author a foundation from which he explores the times of the charachter. In this case that included growing up Jewish in the early 20th century and being invloved in the world of sports.

    3. Short biography of the Detroit Tiger first baseman who almost broke Babe Ruth's single-season home run record. Kurlansky's book focuses on the effect that Greenber's celebrity had on his fellow Jews and his often uncomfortable reaction to it.

    4. Hank Greenberg played baseball for the Detroit Tigers. He had a beautiful swing and at one time was in the running to break Babe Ruth’s single-season home run record. What he is most well known for however, is the game he didn’t play in 1934 because it fell on Yom Kippur. With that act he became a hero to the Jewish people. He was uncomfortable with that label. He didn’t want to be known as “the Jewish ballplayer”, he wanted to be known as a ballplayer that just happened to be Jewish.T [...]

    5. This book is primarily a short, excellent look at one aspect of Greenberg's life. The book provides a general overview of his playing career and life before and after baseball, but that story is also available from other sources. The book does not pretend to be a comprehensive biography. Instead, the book provides excellent insight into Greenberg's personality and identity. I enjoyed the fresh angle, which contributes to the story of an admirable man who had to balance his fame and adoration wit [...]

    6. Obviously you're not going to pick up this book unless you are either Jewish or a big fan of baseball. I am a big fan of Jewish baseball so this was right up my alley. Just a great read on a truly fascinating life. For a Jewish kid (I guess I'm a man now) that grew up in NY on the more reform/conservative side of things, I really found myself sympathizing with Greenberg and simply agreeing with many of his convictions. It was really interesting read, I'm glad my father told me to.

    7. Part of the "Jewish Lives" series. Does a good job of portraying what it was like to be a Jew in the U.S. before WWII and after. The linear story that eventually leads to Jackie Robinson ,draws on the parallels, was well done and movingHank was complex, not religious, almost anti religion but the Shoah made him a strident Zionist.

    8. It was a good read, just realize while it is a biography, it focuses on the religion much more than his career. As a Jewish baseball fan, I found it fascinating.

    9. A warm book about an intriguing hero with many facets to his personality. Light on detail, but easy to read as a result.

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