The Rising Tide

The Rising Tide In Lady Charlotte French McGrath is mistress of Garonlea a huge gothic house in Ireland She rules her household and her family husband Ambrose and children Muriel Enid Violet Diana and Desmon

  • Title: The Rising Tide
  • Author: Molly Keane M.J. Farrell
  • ISBN: 9780860684725
  • Page: 185
  • Format: Paperback
  • In 1900 Lady Charlotte French McGrath is mistress of Garonlea, a huge gothic house in Ireland She rules her household and her family husband Ambrose and children Muriel, Enid, Violet, Diana and Desmond with a rod of iron Desmond s marriage to the beautiful, lively Cynthia and, several years later, the onset of the First World War are the two events which finally, aIn 1900 Lady Charlotte French McGrath is mistress of Garonlea, a huge gothic house in Ireland She rules her household and her family husband Ambrose and children Muriel, Enid, Violet, Diana and Desmond with a rod of iron Desmond s marriage to the beautiful, lively Cynthia and, several years later, the onset of the First World War are the two events which finally, and irrevocably, break Lady Charlotte s matriarchal hold Cynthia enters the Jazz Age and on the surface her life passes in a whirl of fox hunting, drinking and love making But the ghosts of Garonlea are only biding their time they know the source of their power, a secret handed on from one generation to the next.

    • ☆ The Rising Tide || ↠ PDF Read by õ Molly Keane M.J. Farrell
      185 Molly Keane M.J. Farrell
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ The Rising Tide || ↠ PDF Read by õ Molly Keane M.J. Farrell
      Posted by:Molly Keane M.J. Farrell
      Published :2018-08-02T22:33:27+00:00

    1 thought on “The Rising Tide”

    1. This book is very atmospheric and completely time, place, and character-driven. Time passes, and the characters grow older, but there really aren't many dramatic turns. Molly Keane writes suspensefully, though, and gives the impression of underlying currents of darkness and malevolent forces. Most of the drama takes place in the characters' minds and perceptions. The two houses, Garonlea and Rathglass, represent the two time periods (along with their cultural mores), depicted in the book. Garonl [...]

    2. Here Molly Keane turns her early 20th century social commentary on one family's two generations of women in power. She takes on a broader time period than I've seen in her other books, ranging thirty years, in order to bridge the generation gap from the 1900s to the 20s and explore how the power dynamics change not only with the person in charge but with the constraints of each period. Keane presents the 1900s as an absolutely intolerable time to be an unmarried female, particularly in the famil [...]

    3. In The Rising Tide, Molly Keane contrasts brilliantly the Edwardian era with its strict rules of propriety, fussy clothing and the kind of rigid conventions that so often imprisoned unmarried women in dull lives at home, with the freer, party years of the 1920’s. The title reflects the rise of Cynthia, but also those tidal like waves of time, the years pass, and one generation is replaced by the next, the conflicts of one mirrored in the next – time after time.Full review: heavenali.wordpres [...]

    4. This 1930's novel would never be placed on the "Thriller" shelf by a bookseller, but it is darker and more suspenseful than the succession of best-selling "thrillers" written today. Like Iris Murdoch at her peak, Molly Keane, showcases the power of personality to devastating effect.I am drawn to books that feature women with limited choices; it fascinates me to see how they cope and often flourish. Keane has taken this situation a step further: it is not just that her young women are living in a [...]

    5. I enjoyed the atmosphere of Garonlea, the awful family stately home, and the characters were interesting, but I got very bored by the endless descriptions of hunting and horses.

    6. I loved this cleverly-written novel about the vicissitudes of a wealthy Anglo-Irish family living in a gloomy pile of stone called Garonlea in the early 1900s. It's really the story of two women -- the matriarch Lady Charlotte who rules her household with an iron fist; and later, her daughter-in-law Cynthia. The young wife at first seems kinder and more loving, but as time goes on she proves to be equally as power-mad as her predecessor. I couldn't like either woman, mainly because they treated [...]

    7. Molly Keane's writing closely observes the inner thoughts of an Anglo Irish family across the decades from before WWII and just afterwards. There is no comfort to be drawn from the chillingly self obsessed characterization of the two Mothers in this story who are really quite monsterous. She paints a quite horrible picture of the life of these people who seem oblivious of all that is going on around them at the time politically. The writing is clever and can be humorous but always interesting in [...]

    8. A good story of how miserable it was to be an unmarried woman at the turn of the 20th century. We often forget how far we've come. There is still inequality, but nothing like then. Darker, deeper, less funny than other Keane novels. That's good for me, because I don't like her cynical humor that much.

    9. A good read, thoughtprovoking and yet a bit depressing. Perhaps because I feel like I'm leaving youth myself, I don't know. There are things in here I recognise. Set in Ireland in the beginning of the 1900s, this story covers three generations of a landed gentry family living at the gothic estate of Garonlea, and its repressive atmosphere. These are rich folk who are interested in society, horses and hunting, and the realities of the little folk barely touch them - or if they do, they are mentio [...]

    10. I bought this Virago edition many years ago and stumbled on it during a recent/current illness. I got very absorbed in it and really enjoyed it. The story is personal and societal and illuminating. I find a certain resonance with a story about people living in a privileged bubble (as the Anglo-Irish did for centuries.) This book doesn't offer options for the rest of us, but it's a good portrait of entitled ceaselessness. It just sort of suited me right now!

    11. Brilliant and riveting and lyrical, despite the distanced writing style.I'll be hunting out more Molly Keane(Virago need to get their act together editorially though - such a quantity of typos and errors!)

    12. I didn't really like Molly Keane as a teenager. But I re-discovered her in my late 20s and am now a huge fan. It was a pleasure to re-read this old favourite again.

    13. I read this years ago. Set in the early twenties in Ireland, it’s about a family under the control of a strong matriarch broken by events in the First World War.

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