Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism

Dislocating Cultures Identities Traditions and Third World Feminism Dislocating Cultures takes aim at the related notions of nation identity and tradition to show how Western and Third World scholars have misrepresented Third World cultures and feminist agendas Draw

  • Title: Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism
  • Author: Uma Narayan
  • ISBN: 9780415914192
  • Page: 365
  • Format: Paperback
  • Dislocating Cultures takes aim at the related notions of nation, identity, and tradition to show how Western and Third World scholars have misrepresented Third World cultures and feminist agendas Drawing attention to the political forces that have spawned, shaped, and perpetuated these misrepresentations since colonial times, Uma Narayan inspects the underlying problems wDislocating Cultures takes aim at the related notions of nation, identity, and tradition to show how Western and Third World scholars have misrepresented Third World cultures and feminist agendas Drawing attention to the political forces that have spawned, shaped, and perpetuated these misrepresentations since colonial times, Uma Narayan inspects the underlying problems which culture poses for the respect of difference and cross cultural understanding Questioning the problematic roles assigned to Third World subjects within multiculturalism, Narayan examines ways in which the flow of information across national contexts affects our understanding of issues Dislocating Cultures contributes a philosophical perspective on areas of ongoing interest such as nationalism, post colonial studies, and the cultural politics of debates over tradition and westernization in Third World contexts.

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      Published :2019-02-26T12:43:48+00:00

    1 thought on “Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism”

    1. Some notes for critical perspectives on gender class:The pursuit of knowledge, Narayan points out, is not by chance: It is socially constituted.Post-colonial literature provides the space to re-consider the patronizing tendency of the West to consider itself superior to other cultures, and Narayan theorizes that there may indeed be discrepancy in the ways of feminism when considered from different contexts. In western mediums, issues related to women have a more “urgent” tone to them than in [...]

    2. LJ user rhapsodeeinblue :Intersectionality ahoy! Fundamental read to understand our privilege as First World feminists. Narayan explicates that those in First World countries often fail to see the problems of Third World countries outside of a First World lens, which is problematic since information is thus decontextualized. She writes that a "shared and collaborative political understanding [:] between Western and Third-World nations and communities [:] requires, of course, willingness on the p [...]

    3. Because it's all I have at the moment, I've only read Chapter 3, “Cross-Cultural Connections, Border Crossings, and ‘Death by Culture’” and was floored by its intelligence and wit. It's a straightforward look at feminism as it relates to the specific issue of domestic violence in India and America. Already it's clear that she embodies Mohanty's call to feminists to engage in feminism without borders, to provide sensitive, ethical and contextualized analyses of issues as they relate to wo [...]

    4. I love this book. I'm currently reading Chapter Five: Eating Cultures: Incorporation, Identity, and Indian Food. Narayan discusses how re-colonizing practices such as eating are. She talks about the inconsistencies of incorporation, how certain parts of what is India/n gets celebrated, while other parts of India, the "untouchables" for instance, are just so (dirty, by implication). Her discussion fits so nicely with experiences of being a culinary (spicy/exotica)metapor. A must read

    5. Narayan does a good job of helping the reader strip stereotypical perceptions of Third-World feminists. The language can be difficult to muddle through sometimes but on the whole it is a well-thought and well-argued text.

    6. A little repetitive at times, but deliciously personal and insightful at other times as well! Really interesting insights on how Westerners think about, approach and present Indian women.

    7. One of the best professors Vassar has, and one of these days I'll have time to read the full books rather than just chapters.

    8. There's a lot of good stuff in here, but I didn't find the text all that accessible. Also, I think each chapter/essay could have been better organized.

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