The Short and Incredibly Happy Life of Riley

The Short and Incredibly Happy Life of Riley Human beings live for quite a long time and for a lot of that time we are not happy We want to be taller shorter fatter thinner older and younger We want our straight hair to be curly our curly h

  • Title: The Short and Incredibly Happy Life of Riley
  • Author: Colin Thompson Amy Lissiat
  • ISBN: 9781933605500
  • Page: 240
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Human beings live for quite a long time and for a lot of that time we are not happy We want to be taller, shorter, fatter, thinner, older and younger We want our straight hair to be curly, our curly hair to be straight and our brown eyes to be blue We hate our parents, children, teachers, students and everybody We want to be somewhere else, with someone else, eating soHuman beings live for quite a long time and for a lot of that time we are not happy We want to be taller, shorter, fatter, thinner, older and younger We want our straight hair to be curly, our curly hair to be straight and our brown eyes to be blue We hate our parents, children, teachers, students and everybody We want to be somewhere else, with someone else, eating something else, wearing something fantastic no one else can afford, and we want to splash them as we drive by in our big red car Rats live for quite a short time and for most of that time they are very, very happy

    • Best Read [Colin Thompson Amy Lissiat] × The Short and Incredibly Happy Life of Riley || [Poetry Book] PDF ☆
      240 Colin Thompson Amy Lissiat
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Colin Thompson Amy Lissiat] × The Short and Incredibly Happy Life of Riley || [Poetry Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Colin Thompson Amy Lissiat
      Published :2018-08-18T23:45:47+00:00

    1 thought on “The Short and Incredibly Happy Life of Riley”

    1. This book came to me as an award-winner in the Children's Book Council of Australia awards. It's the tale of a rat juxtaposed with the lives of the men and women around him: Riley leads a perfectly happy and easy life while his human counterparts struggle through feeling too fat, too thin, too poor, too rich, etc. The illustrations are quite grotesque and I don't think I would like them very much if I were young again. There's just a bit too much realism in them but doled out in dirt and technic [...]

    2. I immediately fell in love with this book (and Riley) when I first read it. I am pleased to learn that others have as well.It's a laugh-out-loud picture book that uses Photoshop techniques along with quirky illustrations to explore the idea of how materialistic our society is by comparing the lives of humans to the lives of a rat.This book cannot be described - at least by me - which means that you will all have to go out and buy a copy. Actually, once you read it, you may need to buy multiple c [...]

    3. This is billed as a children's book, but I was very moved by the very adult message enough to ask for it for my birthday. My kids like it too, but on a different level than I do.

    4. An Australian author and artist joined forces to bring us a book for our economically pinched times. In Colin Thompson and Amy Lissiat’s “The Short and Incredibly Happy Life of Riley” we learn that rats have short but happy lives, they have everything they want, and more importantly they want everything they have. In contrast, people’s long lives are spent yearning for other, better things, places, and people. “…Realizing that rats have a better life than you do is really, really sad [...]

    5. The Short and Incredibly Happy Life of Riley by Colin Thompson is a reality check for adults and a great life lesson for kids. Less is more is the theme of the story. It's about a very happy, content rat named Riley who is just perfectly content with what he has, which is only what he needs. The story then contrasts the life of humans who are never happy and always want more, more, more. The illustrations are unique, done in photoshop on an Apple Macintosh. The images of Riley are very bright an [...]

    6. To be honest I had no idea how to rate or describe this book. It was crazy and defiantly did not seem like it was a children book! The pictures were weird and kinda bizarre. The story itself was a little nutty and the overall idea that it was presenting was very odd. It was basically saying that a rats like is better than a humans life. The book did of course show us some things that humans do tend to worry about that maybe they don't necessarily need to worry about. IT just has some very adults [...]

    7. I am not entirely sure this is really a children's book but.The story line truly gets one thinking- too philosophical for kids (I think) and the pictures are not really appropriate for children (from my opinion).However- from this adults perspectivee illustrations were GREAT!it's sort of funny that I read this and am reading the Geography of happiness at the same time. In the geography of Happiness the author is trying to figure out what constitutes happiness for humans by visiting places around [...]

    8. My ma gave me this book as a joke, but I do read it to my daughter because I love the life lessons in it. Learn to be happy with enough, with yourself as you are, and stop wasting your life yearning for what you don't have and who you aren't. If rats can do it, so can you.The illustrations are kind of wonky, not my normal pick for a children's style of illustration but I feel like this book is more aimed at and more helpful for adults than children. If you are a parent, read it for yourself - it [...]

    9. I didn't particularly care for the author's editorial thoughts on "MSG" as I felt the book had a good message going and was enjoyable without his personal diatribe. Really, a beginning reader trying to pronounce MSG, give me a break and edit. I like the vermin idea, and kids like mice, rats,etc. just don't push the political message off on young minds, save it for your adult rant and raves with like-minded individuals. Some of these kids are glad to have food to eat, eat all their meals at schoo [...]

    10. I first read this book when I was in high school. I loved it!! I agree with others in saying that the realism and undertones of the book would go right over a child's head but as a teenager this book spoke to me. I immediately loved Riley and the illustrations. I think that it has a great message and really causes the reader to think about how short life really is. Ten years later and I still remember this book fondly

    11. Really enjoyed reading this one to grade 5/6 today. They were really engaged in the story and started to become quite philosophical about why humans are perpetually discontented. This book compares the short, happy life of Riley the rat to the long, and often unhappy, lives of humans. As usual, the illustrations were marvellous - and a little cheeky. It made us think, 'what have we got to complain about'? I continue to love Colin Thompson

    12. Basically, the moral of the story is: be happy with less. A great picture book to read to children aged 5 or 6 and up who have been struck with the I-want-this-he-has-that-why-can't-I-have-life-is-no-fair-I-never-get-to-do-anything-fun. Also a great book for adults who have been struck by the-grass-is-greener phenomena and the she-has-it-so-I-must-have-it-because-it-will-finally-make-me-happy.Read it. Read it now.

    13. I can't tell you how much I love this book! The essential message of this book is to be happy with what you have, and I think it's something a lot of people could learn (including me). I've used it in my classroom with my year 4's, but the message is quite complicated for them so requires some stopping and discussion. This is not a bad thing! The kids love the illustrations (particularly the one where you can see the guy's butt).

    14. This book is about being content. My kids were a little confused about this book. Maybe for upper elementary students it would make more sense. Rats do not have high expectations so rats are happy. Humans have high expectations and are often disappointed and saddened by their disappointments. If we were more content, we could be happier.

    15. If you have five minutes, and need a quick reminder of what some of the most basic virtues in life are, this is the book for you. Supposedly a young child's book, I think that adults caught up in the American "rat race" can benefit the most from this book. Riley the rat has it all figured out and can help you see the beauty in a simple life can ironically pay a great bit in happiness.

    16. Another book like "A Rat in a Stripy Sock". It has the same message but is a little bit darker, and more critical of human beings. Still, it is true. There are rats that have happier lives than some humans.

    17. Wouldn't it be nice to be as easily pleased with life as Riley? The book incorporates the facimilies of famous art to illustrate our disconent which adds an interesting twist. I am not sure I would read this to a younger audience.

    18. This came to me in my "Kit" for my business. My children's-book biz. However, the message is lost on little children. I LOVED IT AND WOULD LOVE TO HAVE EVERYONE I KNOW READ IT! ADORABLE

    19. Hmmmm might be a tad avant garde for a kids picture book. I think the audience might be geared more for adults. Not sure how I feel about this one yet.

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